The Writing Center @ The University of Wisconsin - Madison
The Writer's Handbook
Chicago/Turabian Documentation: First Note for a source

Chicago/Turabian Notes

The first note for a source provides full documentation information for that source. In subsequent notes for the same source, use either a shortened form or a Latin form.

Book

1 author, first edition:

1. Steven Nadler, A Book Forged in Hell: Spinoza's Scandalous Treatise and the Birth of the Secular Age (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011), 8.

1 author, later edition

2. Paul S. Boyer, Purity in Print: Book Censorship in America from the Gilded Age to the Computer Age, 2nd ed. (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 2002), 24.

1 author, reprinted book

3. Leonora Neville, Authority in Byzantine Provincial Society, 950-1100 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004; reprint, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), 101.

2 authors

4. Gerald Marwell and Pamela Oliver, The Critical Mass in Collective Action (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007), 104.

3 authors

5. Julia Child, Louisette Bertholle, and Simone Beck, Mastering the Art of French Cooking (New York: Knopf, 1961), 23.

More than 3 authors

6. Anne Ellen Geller et al., The Everyday Writing Center (Logan, UT: Utah State University Press, 2007), 52.

No author

7. CIA World Factbook (Washington, DC: Central Intelligence Agency, 2009), 64.

Anthology with editors in place of authors

8. The Norton Anthology of African American Literature, ed. Henry Louis Gates and Nellie Y. McKay (New York: Norton, 1997), 172.

Chapter in an edited collection

9. Colleen Dunlavy, "Why Did American Businesses Get So Big?" in Major Problems in American Business History, ed. Regina Blaszczyk and Philip Scranton (New York: Houghton-Mifflin, 2006), 260.

Article

Article in a journal

10. Raúl Sánchez, "Outside the Text: Retheorizing Empiricism and Identity," College English 74 (2012): 243.

[If a journal continues pagination across issues in a volume, you do NOT need to include the issue number.]

Book review

11. Nancy Rose Marshall, review of Joseph Crawhill, One of the Glasgow Boys, by Vivian Hamilton, Victorian Studies 42 (1999/2000): 359.

Newspaper article

12. Tyler Marshall, "200th Birthday of Grimms Celebrated," Los Angeles Times, 15 March 1985, sec. 1A, p. 3.

["p." is used to make clear the difference between the page and section numbers.]

Encyclopedia entry

13. Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th ed., s.v. "Wales."

[sub verbo means "under the word."]

14. Wikipedia, s.v. "Charles R. Van Hise," last modified May 9, 2013, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_R._Van_Hise.

Personal interview

15. Richard Davidson, interview by author, Madison, WI, April 20, 2012.

Secondary source

In rare cases when the original source is not available, use a "quoted in" note to identify your second-hand source for a quotation or idea.

16. Louis Zukofsky, "Sincerity and Objectification," Poetry 37 (February 1931): 269, quoted in Bonnie Costello, Marianne Moore: Imaginary Possessions (Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 1981), 78.

Performance

17. William Shakespeare, Othello, Milwaukee Repertory Theater, Milwaukee, 20 April 2012.

DVD

18. Che, DVD, directed by Steven Soderbergh (New York: Criterion Collection, 2008).

Dissertation

19. Sara M. Lindberg, "Gender-Role Identity Development During Adolescence: Individual, Familial, and Social Contextual Predictors of Gender Intensification" (Ph.D. diss., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2008), 24.

Lecture

20. Morris Young, "What Is Asian American? What is Asian American Literature?" (lecture, Survey of Asian American Literature, University of Wisconsin-Madison, January 22, 2013).

[an unpublished class lecture is cited in a note, but rarely in the Bibliography or Works Cited]

Conference presentation

21. Mary Louise Roberts, "The Public Practice of History in and for a Digital Age" (paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association, New Orleans, January 3, 2013).

[an unpublished conference presentation is cited in a note, but rarely in the Bibliography or Works Cited]

Government document

22. Congressional Record, 71st Cong., 2nd sess., 1930, 72, pt. 10:10828:30.

Online source

Online source that is identical to a print source

23. Lee Palmer Wandel, "Setting the Lutheran Eucharist," Journal of Early Modern History 17 (1998): 133-34, doi: 10.1163/157006598X00135.

[The Chicago Manual recommends including a DOI (digital object identifier) or a URL to indicate that you consulted this source online. If there's a DOI, you should use that rather than a URL. If there is no DOI, use the URL, including "http://." There's no need to include an access date if the online source includes a publication or revision date.]

Online newspaper

24. Kirk Johnson, "Health Care Is Spread Thin on Alaskan Frontier," New York Times, May 28, 2013, http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/29/us/health-care-in-vast-alaska-frontier-is-spread-thin.html?hpw&_r=0.

Website

25. "Human Rights," The United Nations, accessed May 29, 2013, http://www.un.org/en /globalissues/humanrights/, paragraph 3.

[If a website has a publication or revision date, use that instead of an accessed date. If a longer online source does NOT contain page numbers, the Chicago Manual recommends that you include a paragraph number or chapter number or section heading in your note, to help readers find the passage you're citing.]